My Bookshelf

BooksI always have at home more books than I am able to read. And it is never difficult for me to find new books I would like to read.

Currently I am focusing on non-fiction books in topics such as Startups, Business Innovation, Professional Efficacy, Psychology and Behavioral Economics. I discovered that I can have as much pleasure reading non-fiction as I used to have reading fiction.

Below are some recommended books by topic. Good reading!

Startups
lean_startup The Lean Startup: How Today’s Entrepreneurs Use Continuous Innovation to Create Radically Successful Businesses by Eric Ries
zero to one Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future by Peter Thiel
4_hour_workweek The 4-Hour Workweek: Escape 9-5, Live Anywhere, and Join the New Rich by Timothy Ferriss
Professional Success
GiveAndTake Give and Take: A Revolutionary Approach to Success by Adam Grant
ReinventingYou Reinventing You: Define Your Brand, Imagine Your Future by Dorie Clark
ThePowerOfHabit The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business by Charles Duhigg
Efficacy
Drive Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us by Daniel Pink
Switch Switch: How to Change Things When Change Is Hard by Chip Heath & Dan Heath
Contagious Contagious: Why Things Catch On by Jonah Berger
Business and Innovation
Antifragile Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder by Nassim Taleb
InnovatorsDilemma The Innovator’s Dilemma: The Revolutionary Book That Will Change the Way You Do Business by Clayton Christensen
Adapt Adapt: Why Success Always Starts with Failure by Tim Harford
Psychology and Behavioral Economics
ThinkingFastAndSlow Thinking Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman
PredictablyIrrational Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions by Dan Ariely
ParadoxOfChoice The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less by Barry Schwartz
Software
 DesignPatterns Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software by Erich Gamma, Richard Helm, Ralph Johnson and John Vlissides
 Refactoring Refactoring: Improving the Design of Existing Code by Martin Fowler, Kent Beck, John Brant and William Opdyke
 JoelOnSoftware Joel on Software
by Joel Spolsky

4 Responses to My Bookshelf

  1. tevirselrahc says:

    I like the idea of a bookshelf as a page on its own…I think I’ll steal that idea 😉

  2. Jane Martin says:

    The book is critical for beginner developers who want to achieve the next level. The topic is presented as “cleaning up code”. In the process; however, it teaches how to move from bad design to good.

  3. David Gold says:

    Super cool idea!

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